It’s Your Community, It’s Your Regulations, and It’s Your Chance to get involved!

It is not uncommon for local Planning Boards to experience occasional turnover and municipalities are often on the lookout for new volunteers to sit on local review boards such as Planning Boards (PB’s) and Zoning Boards of Appeals (ZBA’s)

Town/Village Planning Boards review applications for a wide range of projects and there is an added benefit to have a similar diversity of experiences and professions on the local review Boards.   Many Boards are fortunate to have a number of individuals who have either retired or have flexible work hours but individuals of all ages and backgrounds can contribute valuable knowledge and input during Planning Board reviews.  Maintaining a diversity of age and occupation also allows for a variety of backgrounds and experiences in each members field of expertise.

Even if the Board is at full-membership, often a town/village will maintain a list of possibly interested individuals to contact if an opening occurs.    Additionally, Planning Board members may feel reluctant to decline another consecutive term if they feel that their absence would create a long-term absence from the Board.

Even the best of intentions don’t always work out.  It is absolutely crucial that board members fulfill their commitment to the town/village by regularly attending each monthly meeting.  Even the most diverse Planning Board is helpless unless a “quorum” or a majority of the Board’s total membership can be maintained.  Without a quorum, the Board cannot conduct business, which can delay applicants until the next month’s meeting.

The Village Planning Board is currently vacant and seeking 5 community members who are interested in serving.  As long as you are 18 years of age and live within the Village of Stamford, you are eligible to serve on the Planning Board.  One meeting a month as required and training will be provided!

Fresh faces are always welcome; we encourage anyone to come to the meetings that may have an interest in getting involved.  Meetings are open to the public, and the best way to get an idea of what goes on at a meeting is to attend.  Contact your local municipal clerk for additional information regarding opportunities in your community.